Royal Jelly


Frequently Asked Questions About Royal Jelly

What is Fresh Royal Jelly?

Royal jelly is a milky whitish yellow secretion produced by worker bees. Its content varies depending on weather, location and the type of bees but it typically contains about 60% to 70% water, 9% to 18% proteins, 11% to 23% carbohydrates, 4% to 8% fats, and 1% to 3% vitamins, salts, and amino acids.

The term “fresh” refers to royal jelly which is immediately bottled and placed in cold storage upon harvesting, with no other substances added to it. Royal jelly is sensitive to heat, light and oxygen exposure. Therefore fresh royal jelly, having gone through the least amount of processing, contains the most amounts of its natural benefits.

Reference:

1. Fratini F, et al. Royal Jelly: An Ancient Remedy with Remarkable Antibacterial Properties. Microbiological Research. 2016; 192: 130-141.

How does Fresh Royal Jelly taste?

Royal jelly has a pungent smell and tastes a little sweet and sour. In terms of texture, it is creamy and gel-like.

If royal jelly is not stored well, it becomes darker in colour and tastes rancid.

References: 

1. Melliou E, Chinou I. Chemistry and Bioactivities of Royal Jelly. Studies in Natural Product Chemistry. Elsevier; 2014. Vol 43; Chap 8: 261-290.

2. Ramadan MF, Al-Ghamdi A. Bioactice Compounds and Health-Promoting Properties of Royal Jelly: A Review. J of Functional Foods. 2012; 4(1): 39-52.

Is Royal Jelly suitable for children and infants?

Yes, Royal jelly is one of the very few nutritional supplements that is safe for infants and children. It has been used to improve appetite, red blood cells’ count, immunity and growth in infants, especially in premature or malnourished ones. It can even improve the child or infant’s adaptation to stress situations (ie. sickness, disease, surgery, etc.)

However, while trying royal jelly for the first few times, a very small quantity should be used to test for allergies and parents should be very observant to look out for signs of allergy such as wheezing, difficulty in breathing, skin irritation or swelling. In rare cases, stomach discomforts and bloody stools may occur. These are signs that your child is allergic or intolerant towards royal jelly.

References:

1. Ingram Dr.C. Royal Jelly – The Research [Internet]. Alba Herbal; [cited 2018 Apr 2]. Available from: http://www.albaherbal.com/herbal-research/royal-jelly-the-research/

2. Royal Jelly [Internet]. WebMD; [cited 2018 Apr 2]. Available from: https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-503-royal%20jelly.aspx?activeingredientid=503&activeingredientname=royal%20jelly

3. Bogdanov S. Royal Jelly, Bee Brood: Composition, Health, Medicine: A Review. Bee Product Science. 2017: 1-41.

How should I store Fresh Royal Jelly?

According to research, royal jelly should be kept in the refrigerator at temperatures of 4°C and below.

Reference:

1. Ramadan MF, Al-Ghamdi A. Bioactice Compounds and Health-Promoting Properties of Royal Jelly: A Review. J of Functional Foods. 2012; 4(1): 39-52.

Can Fresh Royal Jelly be mixed with honey or other ingredients to consume for better result?

According to several research, it is not recommended to buy royal jelly that has been mixed with honey or any other ingredients because the mixing tend to cause a faster decline of many beneficial components of royal jelly over time.

Mixing royal jelly with honey just before eating is however alright because the decline in beneficial components does not happen so quickly and this is a way to make royal jelly more pleasant for consumption. Not to mention, your body will enjoy the benefits of honey as well with this addition.

Other natural foods may also be mixed with royal jelly but the compatibility varies for different items.

Reference: 

1. Dinkov D, et al. Antibacterial Activity of Royal Jelly and Rape Honey Against Methicilin-Resistant Staphyloccus Aureus Strains. J of Food Science and Health. 2016; 2(2): 67-73.

2. Fratini F, et al. Royal Jelly: An Ancient Remedy with Remarkable Antibacterial Properties. Microbiological Research. 2016; 192: 130-141.

3. Ramadan MF, Al-Ghamdi A. Bioactice Compounds and Health-Promoting Properties of Royal Jelly: A Review. J of Functional Foods. 2012; 4(1): 39-52

Is honey or royal jelly good to be added as part of the ingredients for a skincare product?

Honey and royal jelly have both been used for many years as an ingredient for skincare products.

When applied topically, honey and royal jelly have both documented potent anti-bacterial and moisturising effects. Due to their acidic nature and high antioxidant content, they boost skin radiance and the antioxidants also prevent premature aging. They also both have a calming effect on the skin.

Additionally, royal jelly is anti-aging and healing because it promotes the collagen production in the skin.

References: 

1. Ediriweera ERHSS, Premarathna NYS. Medicinal and Cosmetic Uses of Bee’s Honey – A Review. AYU. 2014 Apr; 33(2): 178-182. Pavel CI, et al. Biological Activities of Royal Jelly – Review. Scientific Papers: Animal Science and Biotechnologies. 2011; 44(2): 108-118.

Is royal jelly suitable for animals such as cats, dogs, etc?

Yes, royal jelly is suitable to be fed to animals. There are many researches out there where animals are given royal jelly and the documented health benefits are similar to what we humans experience – anti-aging, fight infections, anticancer, beautifying, health, immune and energy boosting. Many vets also recommend royal jelly as a health food for animals.

For domestic animals like dogs, cats and others around the same size, they can be given between ¼ to ½ teaspoon each day. Smaller animals need less while bigger animals, like horses, can take more. Do bear in mind that allergies are also possible in animals so if you intend to start giving your pet royal jelly, start with very little and observe for any adverse reactions within 24 hours.

References:

1. Teixeira RR, et al. Royal Jelly Decreases Corticosterone Level and Improves The Brain Antioxidant System in Restraint and Cold Stressed Rats. Neuroscience Letters. 2017; 655: 179-185.

2. Caixeta DC, et al. Adaptogenic Potential of Royal Jelly in Liver of Rats Exposed to Chronic Stress. PLoS ONE. 2018; 13(1): e0191889

3. El-Aidy WK, et al. Evaluation of Propolis, Honey and Royal Jelly in Amelioration of Peripheral Blood Leukocytes and Lung Inflammation in Mouse Conalbumin-Induces Asthma Model. Saudi J of Bio Sc. 2015; 22: 780-788.

4. Yoneshiro T, et al. Royal Jelly Ameliorates Diet-Induced Obesity and Glucose Intolerance by Promoting Brown Adipose Tissue Thermogenesis in Mice. Elsevier. 2018; 12(1): 127-137.de Bairacli Levy J. The complete herbal handbook for farm and stable. London: Faber & Faber. 1991.